Sunset skiing on the slopes of Hellskarnuten
Sunset skiing on the slopes of Hellskarnuten
Home Time
Home Time
Pinnacle Gully, Cairngorms
Pinnacle Gully, Cairngorms
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Scotland at its best. The top of Paradise Face, Bidean nam Bian.
Scotland at its best. The top of Paradise Face, Bidean nam Bian.
Number 5 Gully, Ben Nevis
Number 5 Gully, Ben Nevis
Braeriach
Braeriach
The South face of Himmeltinden, a dream descent.
The South face of Himmeltinden, a dream descent.
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Dropping into Chancers
Dropping into Chancers
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Gully skiing at dawn above Loch A'an
Gully skiing at dawn above Loch A'an
All four seasons in Arctic Norway
All four seasons in Arctic Norway
Fabian Linge going big in front of the majestic Lofoten skyline
Fabian Linge going big in front of the majestic Lofoten skyline
Telemark skiing at Glencoe Mountain Resort
Telemark skiing at Glencoe Mountain Resort
Late season spring skiing on Stob Coire nan Lochan
Late season spring skiing on Stob Coire nan Lochan
A high level winter camp and sunrise skiing on Aonach Mor
A high level winter camp and sunrise skiing on Aonach Mor
Paradise Face, Bidean nam Bian
Paradise Face, Bidean nam Bian
The entry to Number 5 Gully, Ben Nevis
The entry to Number 5 Gully, Ben Nevis
Sunset ski mountaineering in Lofoten
Sunset ski mountaineering in Lofoten
Moonlight Gully, Ben Nevis
Moonlight Gully, Ben Nevis
Stornappstinden, Lofoten
Stornappstinden, Lofoten
The Back Corries, Aonach Mor
The Back Corries, Aonach Mor
Coire Dubh, Aonach Mor
Coire Dubh, Aonach Mor
Glacier skiing below Jiehkkevárri, The Lyngen Alps
Glacier skiing below Jiehkkevárri, The Lyngen Alps
Coire an t-Sneachda, The Cairngorms
Coire an t-Sneachda, The Cairngorms
Aonach Mor
Aonach Mor
Peter Mackenzie hucking his way down Diagonal Gully, Cairngorms
Peter Mackenzie hucking his way down Diagonal Gully, Cairngorms
Into the Unknown
Into the Unknown
Y-Gully, Aonach Mor
Y-Gully, Aonach Mor
Scottish Powder
Scottish Powder
Gully skiing in The Lofoten Islands
Gully skiing in The Lofoten Islands
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Peter Mackenzie dropping in at sunset to Coire an t-Sneachda
Peter Mackenzie dropping in at sunset to Coire an t-Sneachda
Skiing or base jumping? Dave Biggin absolutely flying into Marian's on another bluebird day in the Highlands.
Skiing or base jumping? Dave Biggin absolutely flying into Marian's on another bluebird day in the Highlands.
Early season touring on Beinn a'Chrulaiste as the sun sets behind the familiar shape of Buachaille Etive Mòr. Just magical.
Early season touring on Beinn a'Chrulaiste as the sun sets behind the familiar shape of Buachaille Etive Mòr. Just magical.
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Grotto Rush, west face of Aonach Mor
Grotto Rush, west face of Aonach Mor
Tom Southworth charging hard on the slopes of Beinn a'Chrulaiste, Glen Coe
Tom Southworth charging hard on the slopes of Beinn a'Chrulaiste, Glen Coe
Into the haze on Creag Meagaidh
Into the haze on Creag Meagaidh
Beating the Monday blues, lesson one - take the day off and go skiing. Photo on the descent of the south side of Creag Meagaidh, snow conditions filling in nicely at the moment.
Beating the Monday blues, lesson one - take the day off and go skiing. Photo on the descent of the south side of Creag Meagaidh, snow conditions filling in nicely at the moment.
Sunset skiing on Bidean nam Bian
Sunset skiing on Bidean nam Bian
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Rodeo 540, Whistler snowpark
Rodeo 540, Whistler snowpark
Bold Rush, Aonach Mor
Bold Rush, Aonach Mor
Early season in the Cairngorms
Early season in the Cairngorms
The Back Corries
The Back Corries
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Sunset skiing on the slopes of Hellskarnuten
Sunset skiing on the slopes of HellskarnutenA day of huge contrasts in Lofoten. Waking up to gale force winds and heavy rain at all altitudes, mood was admittedly low during breakfast. Holding out some tenuous hopes of the weather improving later on (based on a decidedly shaky looking forecast), we postponed our start until late afternoon. It really paid off in spades.Choosing a short tour up Hellskarnuten (643m) with the potential for decent views to the west (in vain hope of some sort of sunset), we set off in overcast weather with rain still falling. Fortunately things only improved from there, with gaps in the cloud appearing and spirits bolstered by a firmer, springlike snowpack as opposed to the saturated slush we'd encountered the previous day. We reached the col on the summit ridge and Lofoten finally revealed some of its magic. The photos give a good idea of the quality of the descents we enjoyed as the sun set behind the mountains to the west. Another day I've had this season that proves that it's always worthwhile in getting out and having a go.
Home Time
Home Time
Pinnacle Gully, Cairngorms
Pinnacle Gully, CairngormsPeter Mackenzie gets ready to drop into the technical upper section of Pinnacle Gully, a Grade I winter climb above the Loch A'an Basin in the Cairngorms.
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Scotland at its best. The top of Paradise Face, Bidean nam Bian.
Scotland at its best. The top of Paradise Face, Bidean nam Bian.Early starts for hill days never get any easier. Pulling myself out of bed at 1.30am this morning, I cursed myself for not doing the drive up to Glencoe the night before. The plan was for a dawn-raid on the Bidean nam Bian massif, setting off from the car park in the dark to reach the summit of Stob Coire nan Lochan in time for sunrise. After a mere three hours sleep, all common sense was telling me to go back to bed, but the forecast was too good to turn down. Clear skies, and sun with the potential for fog down in the glens, and my first opportunity to ski steeps on spring-like snow this season.Meeting Brodie and his mate from uni, Balasz in the viewpoint car park, we set off on the long slog up the staircase to Coire nan Lochan. This is has got to be a strong contender for ‘most deceptively long walk-in in Scotland’ and it always amazes me how I consistently manage to underestimate it. Setting off in a buoyant mood, I thought we’d knock it off in no time at all. It didn’t take long to remember how crap it actually was, and allied with the realisation that despite stripping down my gear down to bare essentials, my rucksack still weighed a tonne, early morning positivity quickly dissipated. Despite this, we set a good pace upwards and reached the ridge above the Coire as the sun was beginning to rise… Wow, It really was a stunner. Easily worth the early rise and the 'anything but leisurely' pace we’d set up the hill so far.Temperatures had been uncharacteristically high this week resulting in a major thaw across the whole of the Highlands. With temperatures below freezing through the night, things had melted and refrozen and a lot of the snow (particularly in the gullies) was completely bulletproof. We decided to try for the North-East face first, waiting on the summit until the sun softened it enough to make it skiable. When it did, boy was it good. A steep and narrow top section with lots of exposure opened out into a wider face further down. Balasz led the way, laying down confident jump turns in superb spring snow, before Brodie and I followed down after. After clearing the potential dangers posed by a few rock bands near the top, we were able to really open up on the bottom section. Buzzing from the first line of the day, there was only one thing for it - back up for more. Traversing round the back of Stob Coire nan Lochan, we climbed to the summit of Bidean nam Bian via the snow ridge connecting the two peaks. We half had a look down Central Gully on the Church Door Buttress, but it looked icy and it was clear there was no way it was gonna go today. After taking in the views on the summit all the way south to Loch Lomond and north to Skye, we instead settled for the huge wide face on the north east side of Bidean nam Bian. We were rewarded with an amazing ski all the way to the floor of Coire Gabhail - the Lost Valley of Glencoe, before hiking along the valley floor and completing the loop back to the car.
Number 5 Gully, Ben Nevis
Number 5 Gully, Ben NevisBack in Scotland and back on The Ben - on this occasion with the Inverness Backcountry Snowsports Club. With it's grand, almost alpine scale and the extensive climbing history associated with it, the North Face of The Ben always feels like a very special place to be.Starting early from the CIC Hut (situated at the foot of the complex array of ridges, buttresses and gullies that make up the face), we ascended via Ledge Route. This made for a relatively straightforward, but entertaining route up, with plenty of options for short technical sections and big exposure on either side. It had snowed a lot the previous week, so we took good time examining different options for our ski descent from the summit plateau. Ruling out No.3 and No.4 Gullies due to both huge cornices guarding the entries, and also rock solid snow conditions at the top, we eventually settled on No.5 Gully. I'd skied No.5 once previously and it makes for a brilliant descent. It's a line that starts as a wide open bowl, before taking you through a set of narrows and back into a further open bowl, all the while losing around 600m vertical. It feels like a real journey and once again it didn't disappoint here. Hard snow conditions in the steep, 50 degree top section made for an intimidating and testing entry, where a fall or slip up in technique would have had consequences. Fortunately this quickly gave way to softer conditions and we were able to relax more and enjoy the remainder of the descent.
Braeriach
Braeriach
The South face of Himmeltinden, a dream descent.
The South face of Himmeltinden, a dream descent.Parking our cars by a beach on the island of Vestvågøya we started up Himmeltindan, the highest mountain on the island. The ascent was steep but we were rewarded with absolutely breathtaking views the entire way. This was perhaps the most beautiful peak I've ever climbed with skis, and we rightly spent a good time at the summit taking in the expansive views laid out below us. Strapping on our skis, we then enjoyed a brilliant 900m descent down the south face, with a light amount of fresh snow almost all the way to sea level.
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Dropping into Chancers
Dropping into ChancersLiam Swanson going for a massive drop off the cornice into Chancers at Nevis Range
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Gully skiing at dawn above Loch A'an
Gully skiing at dawn above Loch A'anMy first taste of Cairngorms gully skiing today on a mad, mad day which somehow completely blew all expectations out of the water. Setting off from the car park at 6.45am under a starry sky, we headed over the back of Cairngorm and were able to ski three big gully lines in an 8 hour tour before sunset. First up we tentatively had a look in Diagonal Gully, not really knowing how much snow would be in it, or what condition it would be in. Scoping it out from the top it looked like it would go and seemed very stable. We dropped in as the sun was rising in the East, filling the gully with a magical glow. What followed was a descent that could easily have been in either Norway or the Alps, with superb soft snow down the entire gully. Buoyed with confidence how good Diagonal had been, we decided to take a look at the top of Pinnacle Gully on the other side of the Coire. Again it looked good from the top, however with a technical and steep entrance. After picking what looked like a good line in we set off, bouncing through powder turns, enclosed by the dramatically steep gully walls. To finish the day we headed for the top of Aladdin's Couloir in Coire an t-Sneachda. We were disappointed to find the entrance windswept and icy, however the snow looked tantalisingly good further down. With a potential no-fall zone below, this entry would've been an absolute no-go on skis - fortunately enough we met a climbing party topping out on another route in the Coire, who were kind enough to give us a lower on their rope over the difficulties, opening up the gully.After a beautiful run down Aladdin's, all that was left was a blast from the foot of the gully along the 'Ultimate Blue Run' and back to the car park. Winter may have taken it's time turning up, but what a day when it finally did. Big thanks to Peter Mackenzie for sharing a truly memorable day with me, and to the climbing party for their help with Aladdin's!
All four seasons in Arctic Norway
All four seasons in Arctic NorwayCraig Cameron fighting high winds and spindrift on his way to the summit of Stornappstinden (740m). A day of real 'Scottish' conditions in arctic Norway, where our persistence on the way up was rewarded with a great ski down the steeps on the south face of the mountain.
Fabian Linge going big in front of the majestic Lofoten skyline
Fabian Linge going big in front of the majestic Lofoten skyline
Telemark skiing at Glencoe Mountain Resort
Telemark skiing at Glencoe Mountain Resort
Late season spring skiing on Stob Coire nan Lochan
Late season spring skiing on Stob Coire nan LochanSaturday came around, and yet again I found myself leaving Glasgow at 3am for another sunrise start. In all honesty, I was struggling to get excited about this one. Although conditions had been great for spring skiing all week, the snow cover was likely to be pretty lean by now, and worse still an overnight frost was likely to have frozen what was left, rendering it solid and unskiable. We'd banked some optimistic hopes on the sun forecast during the day warming things sufficiently to ski a few lines by the time we'd reached the snow line.Meeting Peter Mackenzie in the Three Sisters carpark in Glen Coe, we came up with a plan that catered for a possible day spent hoofing around not skiing anything. For the ascent we decided to build in a Grade 3 scramble directly up the nose of Gearr Aonach, carrying our skis on our back. Following the ridge-line along would give us good views into both the Lost Valley and Coire nan Lochan and allow us to make a call on what was skiable in the area. Neither of us had taken this route up before, and once we got on it, neither of us could believe how good it was. Straightforward scrambling, with great exposure and superb views up and down Glencoe as the sun was rising at the head of the glen. After countless outings training for the Glencoe Skyline race up here last year, I thought I'd discovered everything the Bidean nam Bian massif had to offer. It was nice therefore to come across a new route up, offering a completely fresh perspective on the mountain.Moving along the ridge we had a quick warm-up run down from the North-East ridge of Stob Coire nan Lochan. Snow conditions were scratchy, however it was warming up fast. We moved onto the summit of Bidean nam Bian and from here we were able to put our skis on at the summit and blast down the aptly named Paradise Face. By this point conditions had softened significantly and we decided to finish up with a run down the North-East face of Stob Coire nan Lochan. A line I'd skied earlier in the season, which was now a lot leaner, requiring a down-climb from the summit to access, some tight jump turns on the way down, and a down climb (or in Pete's case, a ballsy straight-line). Highlight of the day was far and away the route up, however a few good runs in some decent spring snow is always a bonus.
A high level winter camp and sunrise skiing on Aonach Mor
A high level winter camp and sunrise skiing on Aonach MorA big 24 hours on Aonach Mor. With a settled couple of days weather forecast, I pulled together a hasty plan with Kev Neal for a high level camp at 4000ft, providing an ideal base from which to access the back corries at sunrise. After a chilly night, we woke and were pretty relieved to find the forecast had stayed as promised. A bit of discussion around lines to ski and we eventually settled on Easy Gully (just 50 yards from the tent!). Plenty of snow drifting through the night gave us fresh tracks in the most awesome morning light. On a good day, this terrain is as good as anywhere in the world, and it was a total privilege to have the place to ourselves at first light.
Paradise Face, Bidean nam Bian
Paradise Face, Bidean nam BianBalazs Turi opening up on the aptly named Paradise Face on the North East flanks of Bidean nam Bian.
The entry to Number 5 Gully, Ben Nevis
The entry to Number 5 Gully, Ben NevisWith seventeen skiers (and one snowboarder) staying in the CIC Hut, the North Face of The Ben was always going to be a spectacle this weekend. In no way did it disappoint. Despite a miserable forecast, good early conditions on day 1 lured the group out of the comfort of the hut to begin the troop up to Coire na Ciste. Optimistically we believed we'd somehow lucked out on the weather front. This optimism was of course to be short-lived, and sure enough, within 10 minutes monsoon season arrived on The Ben. For a full hour, the weather put in its best efforts to wreck the day, however it didn't contend with the gritty never-say-die attitude that you develop from regular skiing in Scotland. Undeterred, the group pressed on and the first day saw descents of No.3, No.4 and No.5 gullies in great spring conditions. To round the day off, 14 of the group gathered at the top of Tower Gully, the longest complete descent on the mountain, with an intimidating no-fall zone in the upper section. To the total astonishment of a crowd of walkers which had gathered to watch from the summit, the 14 of us then set off in a mass descent of the gully, an incredible sight on britain's highest mountain.
Sunset ski mountaineering in Lofoten
Sunset ski mountaineering in LofotenFabian Linge and Niall MacPherson push for the summit of Hellskarnuten during a sunset skiing session in the Lofoten Islands.
Moonlight Gully, Ben Nevis
Moonlight Gully, Ben NevisWith half the day left, we spotted a narrow gully line to lookers left of No.5 gully, which none of us had skied before. From a distance looked in condition, however we decided to climb it first to get a feel for conditions. Moonlight Gully comes in as a Grade II winter climb, and it was steep, but we reckoned the snow was just soft enough to make a descent. Most of the gully was a couple of metres wide, enough to put jump turns in the whole way down. The exception to this was the entry - a 20ft section that was too narrow to turn, and would have required a bold straightline, with limited options to take speed off after. Deciding today was not a day for heroics, we opted to down-climb this section, putting on our skis just below and enjoying a great descent down the atmospheric gully, all the way back to Coire na Ciste.
Stornappstinden, Lofoten
Stornappstinden, LofotenAl Todd on the summit ridge of Stornappstinden (740m) during an 'all four seasons and the kitchen sink' kind of day. Still, it ended up clearing up in time for a fun ski off the left hand side of the ridge down the south face of the mountain.
The Back Corries, Aonach Mor
The Back Corries, Aonach MorThe Back Corries on Aonach Mor contain some truly world-class lift-accessed terrain. Here, Peter Mackenzie drops into Chancers in usual explosive fashion.
Coire Dubh, Aonach Mor
Coire Dubh, Aonach MorStill buzzing from one of the best weekends I've had out in Scotland in a long time. Yesterday I captured this image and I think it's one of my favourite photos I've taken recently. Partly because it's always rewarding to try something a bit different and pull it off. Mostly however, I love it because it sums up everything that's great about skiing Coire Dubh in the Back Corries. From the steep committing entrances, to the vast arena type feel, with onlookers either picking their lines or cheering on others as they drop in. I caught this at the end of the day, as the last of the sun was catching the top of the Coire, and on the last untracked section of the northern end. In order to get the shot, I had to ski in below the lip, and perch pretty tentatively on the steepest aspect. I then asked Tom to ski his line, taking the steepest possible entry, with the sun directly behind him, which he did brilliantly.I'm quickly learning that one of the biggest highs in adventure sports photography comes when you have an idea in your head as to how you want a shot to turn out, you know you might only have one attempt to get that shot, and you manage to get that shot first time and get a good result from it.
Glacier skiing below Jiehkkevárri, The Lyngen Alps
Glacier skiing below Jiehkkevárri, The Lyngen AlpsAfter a long days touring in a remote area of the Lyngen Alps, we came across this pristine, untracked glacier sitting nestled below the highest mountain in the region, Jiehkkevárri. With the sun just beginning to dip towards the horizon, we knew there was potential for a great shot of the group skiing in formation down the nose of the glacier. Leaving my camera, along with some hurried instructions in the capable hands of Nicola Jackson, we raced off up the the glacier. After much shouting and frantic hand waving to check everything was good to go, we set off in a line, skiing the most beautiful snow in a truly grand setting. Brilliant work by Nic on the camera, she absolutely nailed this one!
Coire an t-Sneachda, The Cairngorms
Coire an t-Sneachda, The CairngormsResorting to a bit of improvised artificial light (a headtorch) to capture this shot of Peter MacKenzie hucking his way down Coire an t-Sneachda, as the sun sets over the horizon to the west.
Aonach Mor
Aonach MorPeter Mackenzie opening up in front of the stunning backdrop of Càrn Mòr Dearg and Ben Nevis.
Peter Mackenzie hucking his way down Diagonal Gully, Cairngorms
Peter Mackenzie hucking his way down Diagonal Gully, Cairngorms
Into the Unknown
Into the UnknownPeter Mackenzie skis into the clag on the upper section of Tower Gully on Ben Nevis, a line notable for a big no-fall zone on its upper reaches.
Y-Gully, Aonach Mor
Y-Gully, Aonach MorDave Biggin, a Fort William local and past winner of the Scottish Freedom Series took us down Y-Gully for a 'warmup run' today. With a steep and fairly hard-pack entrance it was by some distance the most challenging warmup run I've done! Here's Dave demonstrating the 'Route One' approach.
Scottish Powder
Scottish PowderKev Neal slashing big powder turns at first light on the exit slopes of Easy Gully, following an overnight camp at 4000ft on Aonach Mor.
Gully skiing in The Lofoten Islands
Gully skiing in The Lofoten IslandsOne of our big aims of the trip was to ski the famous Trollsadelen south gully. In good snow conditions, this should have been a straightforward objective, mellower and less steep than a lot of the gullies I've skied in Scotland this winter. The day we went for it however, it was in what you'd call 'full Scottish condition' - largely bulletproof and in flat light. There was something slightly ironic about the fact that all the gullies I'd skied in Scotland already this season that had been in brilliant nick, with good visibility and great snow conditions, yet I'd had to travel all the way to Norway to find these proper Scottish conditions. Despite the testing conditions in the 45 degree gully, we all made it down the 900m descent in good shape, and we were even treated to some atmospheric views down to the sea below. Perhaps not the most enjoyable ski descent, but a serious day out in big terrain, and the feeling of a real adventure.
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Peter Mackenzie dropping in at sunset to Coire an t-Sneachda
Peter Mackenzie dropping in at sunset to Coire an t-SneachdaOne of the perks of living in Scotland, is if there's been enough snow during the winter, then the longer evenings open up the potential for after-work ski sessions. Yesterday evening was the first of these this year, joining Pete, Xavier, Calum and Adam over at Cairngorm to ski some lines in Coire an t-Sneachda. Making use of the easy high access afforded by the Cairngorm car park, we were able to set a rapid pace to the top of the coire. After a short while scoping out the various options, we each chose our lines and dropped in just as the sun was setting to the North-West. These kind of experiences are always incredible and tend to be the ones that really stick with you. This one was well worth the effort.
Skiing or base jumping? Dave Biggin absolutely flying into Marian's on another bluebird day in the Highlands.
Skiing or base jumping? Dave Biggin absolutely flying into Marian's on another bluebird day in the Highlands.
Early season touring on Beinn a'Chrulaiste as the sun sets behind the familiar shape of Buachaille Etive Mòr. Just magical.
Early season touring on Beinn a'Chrulaiste as the sun sets behind the familiar shape of Buachaille Etive Mòr. Just magical.
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Grotto Rush, west face of Aonach Mor
Grotto Rush, west face of Aonach MorA big ski-mountaineering double on the west face of Aonach Mor. A descent down the narrow, steep gully 'Grotto Rush', followed by a climb back up to the summit via the ridge that formed the right hand wall of the gully, the classic route 'Golden Oldy'.Grotto Rush was an incredible descent, a long and winding gully of around 500m length, with good snow the whole way down and fantastic ciews out to Carn Mor Dearg and Ben Nevis. The cover was so good in the gully that even the ice step, was skiable, removing the need for any rappelling. Reaching the exit of the gully, we knew we were up against it time-wise to get up the ridge and back in time for the last gondola down the hill. Keen to avoid the long hike out, we moved-together alpine style. The ridge was rapidly melting in the afternoon sun, and more than once we considered bailing off and abseiling back down to the valley below, however we persevered and made it back to the ski-centre with 5 minutes to spare. What a day.
Tom Southworth charging hard on the slopes of Beinn a'Chrulaiste, Glen Coe
Tom Southworth charging hard on the slopes of Beinn a'Chrulaiste, Glen Coe
Into the haze on Creag Meagaidh
Into the haze on Creag MeagaidhGordon Pearson ripping tele turns into the clouds on Creag Meagaidh. It's November, could not have asked for a much better start to the Scottish season.
Beating the Monday blues, lesson one - take the day off and go skiing. Photo on the descent of the south side of Creag Meagaidh, snow conditions filling in nicely at the moment.
Beating the Monday blues, lesson one - take the day off and go skiing. Photo on the descent of the south side of Creag Meagaidh, snow conditions filling in nicely at the moment.
Sunset skiing on Bidean nam Bian
Sunset skiing on Bidean nam BianMay arrived in 2015 and the longer days opened up the possibility of skiing after work. Leaving Perth in time to get to Glencoe around for 7pm, we set good pace up towards the summit of Bidean nam Bian. A vague plan to ski Central Gully on the North-West Buttress was put to bed by a large rock step near the bottom, so we went for a solid plan B of skiing the Church Face. Reaching the summit around 9pm as the sun was beginning to set, we were able to get in a couple of absolutely magic turns in soft spring snow before the sun dropped away behind the West Summit. The lower section of the face was quickly firming up as it the temperature cooled and with the added steepness, made for a challenging ski. Walking off the hill in the late evening glow, it was back to the car and back down to Glasgow for around midnight.
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Rodeo 540, Whistler snowpark
Rodeo 540, Whistler snowparkSomething slightly different from a trip to Canada last February. Unfortunately my first trip to North America coincided with one of their worst winters in recent memory. This largely constrained us to blasting the pistes and spending a bit of time in the park. I'm relatively useless myself at any sort of freestyle, however good pal, Rennie Husband is fairly handy. Here's a sequence shot of him throwing a Rodeo 540 in the Whistler park.
Bold Rush, Aonach Mor
Bold Rush, Aonach MorNiall McPherson and Brodie Hood enjoying some racy turns on the exit from Bold Rush. A weekend of claggy and overcast weather salvaged by finding some great dry powder in this atmospheric line of the west face of Aonach Mor.
Early season in the Cairngorms
Early season in the Cairngorms
The Back Corries
The Back Corries
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